Jul 12

20 Insane Marathon Costumes (you thought 26.2 was hard in shorts)

You thought running 26.2 miles was a challenge?  Check out what these crazy marathoners wore for 26.2 miles. The top 20 insane marathon costumes.  Did we miss one?  Share it in the comments below.

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1. Just a Man in a Chicken Suit . . . NBD

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2. Storm Trooper Pushing Baby R2D2

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3. Superheros Getting a Workout

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4. Leprechauns Run Too

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5. Zombie Pirates on the Prowl

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6. Gorilla Man Loves Aid Station Bananas

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7. Lose the Lake?

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8. Sumo Guy Trying to Cut Weight

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9. His and Hers

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10. What The ?#$%

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11. Nurse Bertha

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12. Who Lives in a Pineapple Under the Sea?

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13. Go Fred!

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14. There’s Something on Your Back

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15. 2 Men 1 Camel . . . 26 Miles

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16. Got Milk?

Dressing up is a staple of marathons all over, Brighton is no different. http://www.mattgrover.me.uk/

17. Getting Back to Nature

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18. Spam Man

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19. Need to Call Home

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20. Big Bird and Sonic Out For a Jog

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Image Credits: Stephen ToppDave HuntStephen ToppStephen Toppdarwin BellStephen ToppStephen Toppthomas_slyTom HarrisonHideya HAMANOShimelle LaineTom HarrisonTom HarrisonTom HarrisonMatt GroverChris WaitsPete Sheffield

Did we miss one?  Share it in the comments below.

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Jul 08

15 CRAZY Things Runners Say When They Talk to Themselves During Races

Runners are kinda strange people.  I can say that. . . I’m a runner.

We talk to ourselves.  I mean what else are we supposed to do during a 3, 4, or 5 hour race.

Here are the top 15 crazy things we say when we talk to ourselves during races.  Did I miss one? Share it below in the comments.

1. Seriously . . How the Hell is HE Passing Me?

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2. Smashing Water Cups Feels Pretty Bitchn’

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3. Yeah, I Should Have Worn the Band-Aids

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4. These Dumb Things Only Hold Like 1oz of Water . . . Now I Have to Carry This Belt for 24 More Miles

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5. I Paid HOW MUCH for This?

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6. Chicks Dig Marathoner

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7. Yeah . . . But I DO Get The FREE Shirt Right?

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8. The Race STARTS at Mile 20

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9. Dang . . .Everyone Else Is Wearing a Watch . . . Just Look at Wrist and Act Like I’m Pushing Buttons

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10. Maybe I Should Buy Shorter Shorts

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11. Hmm . . . Guess I Should Have Gotten Here Earlier

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12. Crap . . . I Should Have Used the Porta Potty 3 Miles Back

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13. So THIS Is “The Runners High”

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14. The Medal Better Be HUGE . . and My Friends Better be Jealous

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15. NEXT DAY: “Why Am I Signing Up For Another Race?”

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Did you enjoy this article?  Why not share it?

Did I miss something?  Share it in the comments below.

Photo Credits: Stephen Matthews, Alan StrakeysamwebsterRennett StoweZervasJeff MoriartyEdwin MartinezBrett WhaleyDamian, Nathan RupertTony AlterChris BarberMorten Siebuhr

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Jun 26

Women are Out Running Men (let’s go boys!)

Competitive running was historically a heavily male dominated sport.  Think back to the first Olympics back in Greece.  Women were not allowed to participate at all in the games and married women were not even allowed to attend the games.

The first woman to run the Boston Marathon was Roberta Gibb and that wasn’t until 1966 and she wasn’t even supposed to be there.  Women were not officially allowed to run the race until as late as 1972! Roberta had to register for the event as Bobbi.  Keep in mind the race has been around since 1897.

For the majority of the 1970s, 80s, and 90s men outnumbered women in official running events.  However something changed between 2005 and 2012 and the number of women running events began to grow exponentially, with women now outnumbering men by nearly 2,000,000 in organized running events.

Women Taking Over Running

Below is an infographic depicting how women are taking over the sport of running!  Feel free to use this graphic on your site (the code to embed on your site is at the bottom of the post).

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So what do you think?  Do you think women will continue to outnumber men in races?

Sources:

  • http://www.runningusa.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=news.details&ArticleId=333
  • http://www.runningusa.org/state-of-sport-2013-part-III?returnTo=annual-reports
  • http://www.mizunousa.com/running/blog/the-planet-wave-why-women-are-better-marathoners-than-men/

 

Download this infographic.

Embed Our Infographic On Your Site!

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Jun 09

6 Tips For Training For A Marathon AFTER Having a Baby

I ran my first marathon at 26 years old.  The feeling I felt after I crossed the finish line instantly alleviated my pain and fatigue.  I loved the feeling so much that the next day I signed up for two more marathons.  When I decided I wanted to have children I made a deal with myself. After each baby I would run another marathon.  With each marathon I have learned new things.  I wanted to share some experiences and some suggestions for post baby training.

1. Be careful not to rush back into training after the baby is born. Listen to your body and your doctor to know when you are ready.  The generic timeframe is 6 weeks, but this is just a guide.  After my first baby I started jogging at exactly 6 weeks after the baby was born.  Unfortunately I wasn’t completely healed, and a few weeks later I went back to the doctor because of persistent pain where my stitches had been.  I hadn’t completely healed, and had started back a little too soon. On the other hand after my second child I started running about 4 weeks after baby was born. I felt great and could tell that I had healed.  I have never had a c-section, but make sure you doctor is on board with your plans to workout.

2.  Running while nursing.  Initially the biggest challenge will be the amount of time between feedings.  Infants usually nurse every 3 hours.  If your baby nurses slowly you may only have a couple hours between feedings to get in a jog.  The good thing is as your baby gets older the time between feedings increases.  This will allow a little more time for long runs as your baby gets older.

3.  Warm Up and Cool Down.  Your body has been through a lot and you probably weigh a little more than you did before your baby was born.  It is more important now than ever to warm up and cool down properly.  The point of a warm up and cool down is twofold: first you don’t want to pull a cold muscle by going too hard too fast, second you want to ease your heart into your workout.  A nice stretch at the end of your workout will help you stay nice and flexible and may increase your stride.  It is best to do this at the end while your muscles are warm.

4. Running with your baby.  One of the most rewarding aspects of training for a marathon after you have a baby is including your baby in your workouts.  I bought a jogging stroller before my son was born and as soon as I was ready I started bringing him with me.  Occasionally I snuck in a few runs without the stroller, but most my long runs were with my little guy.  The longest run I did with my son was an 18 mile run.  I brought a bottle with breast milk in a little cooler with an ice pack.  My young son liked the motion of the stroller and slept very well.  When he woke up I let him drink the milk from the bottle and I pumped as soon as my run was done.  All the other runs went very well, but the last couple miles my son was upset and couldn’t be consoled.  After a diaper change and cuddling he still wouldn’t calm down.  The last couple miles I ended up holding him in one arm and pushing the stroller in the other.  Looking back this run probably took more out of me than the marathon, which is what made it a perfect training run.

5. Be prepared for bad weather.  One day I went on a run with my jeep jogging stroller.  I strapped my son into his car seat and set the car seat into the stroller.  I took off on a 4 mile run.  About a mile and a half away from home it started to pour.  Huge drops of rain gushing down.  I put the car seat cover and stroller cover up and hoped my little son wouldn’t get too wet.  I raced home as fast as I possibly could but I was drenched from head to foot within in couple minutes.  I felt like I was having buckets of water poured onto my head.  I got home and rushed my son inside the house.  I finally opened the car seat cover and my son was completely dry.  There were a couple drops on his blanket, but they hadn’t gotten through to his skin.  He was cozy in his little seat and happy as could be.  It was one of my fastest runs and once I knew my son was safe and dry the rainy run was pretty awesome!

6.  Stretch time with baby.  My favorite time was the end of my runs talking to my little guy and tickling him while I stretched on the floor next to him.  It helped me make sure to take the time I needed to get a nice deep stretch while my muscles were still warm. This is sort of my reward in my habit loop of running.

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My 6 month old son cheered me on at the Chicago marathon in 2011 and was waiting for me at the end of the race.  He had a teddy bear and flowers for me when I saw him.  It felt so good to hold him in my arms at the end of such a big event.  I hope that my marathon promise will help me to always stay healthy for my little ones.  And some day I hope I will run along with them when they run their first big race.

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May 14

8 Moms Who Run Marathons (they are pretty DAMN fast too)

There are a couple of things I am pretty sure I will never do in my life.

  1. Run a sub 3:00 marathon
  2. Have a baby

I am pretty confident the baby thing will never happen, unless Arnold Schwarzenegger was on to something in Junior.  I know I will never run a sub 3:00 marathon.  I have tried and my best was only a 3:24.  So my mind is always blown away by a mom who can run a marathon after having a baby.

So lets introduce our 8 Elite Marathon Moms.   To be completely honest, I have included a few triathletes in our list, but to be fair these moms not only run a marathon, but also swim 2 miles and bike 100 miles before the marathon, so I felt they more than qualified.

  1. Paula Radcliffe
  2. Kara Goucher
  3. Deena Kastor
  4. Jessica Jacobs
  5. Emma Gerrard
  6. Sara Gross
  7. Heather Gollnick
  8. Michelle Andres

Paula Radcliffe

2 Children, 2:15:38 Womens Marathon World Record Holder

CC Copyright fergie lancealot

CC Copyright fergie lancealot

Not only is Paula a mother of two children, but she holds the current world record in the marathon, is a 3 time London Marathon winner, 3 time New York Marathon winner (the year she had her baby, and the year after), and a one time Chicago Marathon winner.  She has also won countless awards and accolades for her running accomplishments.

Oh, and did I mention that she has asthma? Oh, and anemia.

Paula is truly an inspiration to mom and athletes everywhere. On training while pregnant Paula has said“The minute you find out you are pregnant, your priorities change, and of course I slowed down.  I ran for health and pleasure, not for competitive reasons”.    Of course just 12 days after having her baby she was back out training, but later admitted that 3 weeks may have been better.

She won the 2007 New York Marathon just 10 months after having her baby.

Never set limits, go after your dreams, don’t be afraid to push the boundaries. And laugh a lot – it’s good for you!

Paula Radcliffe

CC Lisence Flickr user Alan Cordova

CC Lisence Flickr user Alan Cordova

Kara Goucher

1 child, 2008, 2012 Olympics, 3 Time NCAA Champion

Flicker User Stewart Dawson

Flicker User Stewart Dawson

Kara burst onto the marathon scene in 2008 by finishing 3rd at the Boston Marathon.  She gave birth to her son in 2010, in 2011 she placed 5th at the Boston Marathon with a time of 2:24:52 a PR by more than a minute and beating her 2009 (pre baby) Boston time by 7 1/2 minutes.  Shortly after that she was on her way to the 2012 London Olympics.

She has won many other races and events since having a child and has proven her strength as a runner in recent years.

Acknowledge all of your small victories. They will eventually add up to something great.

Kara Goucher

Deena Kastor

1 chlid, US Record holder in Marathon, Half-Marathon, 15k, 8k, 5k

Photo take by: Ambio

Photo take by: Ambio

Deena gave birth to her first child in February 2011, eleven months later she ran a 2:30:40 marathon to place 6th at the age of 39. Since then she has gone on to place 3rd at the LA Marathon and 9th at the world championships at the age of 40.

Deena is truly an athlete that takes excuses away from the regular folk like you and I.  Despite being a mother and “over the hill” she continues to compete on the world stage as an elite marathoner. In 2006 she was named the top womens marathoner in the world.

When you have the enthusiasm and the passion, you end up figuring how to excel.

Deena Kastor

 

Jessica Jacobs

1 child, 2012 Kona IronMan World Championships 26th place (11:38:39)

Jessica began racing triathlons in 2011 and quickly became hooked on the sport.  Despite a frustrating first  race she returned for more races and qualified for the 2012 IronMan World Championships where she placed 26.  In 2013 she completed 5 Half IronMan races (70.3) and 2 Full IronMan races never placing below 14th. Her IronMan PR is a stellar 8:55:10, good enough for a 1st place finish at the 2011 Florida IronMan. . . All this while raising a daughter!

Emma Garrard

1 child, Multiple top finished in XTERRA Championships and Winter Triathlon Championships

Emma is a serious competitor and a very busy woman. On top of training for XTERRA and Winter Triathlon races, she is a mom, a photographer, and she coaches various athletic programs. In 2011 alone, she ran 11 organized races. Most recently she placed 2nd in the 2014 XTERRA West Championships just weeks after being bedridden with sickness.  This was her best finish in a pro race. . . EVER. All this just months after having a baby.

She keeps a very fun and inspring blog at EMMAGARRARD.com outlining her workouts, family time, and races.  If you ever wanted to get an inside look at racing and training with kids, this is probably the best blog to read from a professional athlete.

Smart preparation in not-ideal circumstances can only get you far, good results also require consistent specific training.

Emma Garrard

Sara Gross

2 Chlidren, Professional Triathlete

In 2013 Sara completed 11 triathlon races, completing the Zurich Ironman in 9:55 and placing in the top 3 in 6 of those races.  Yes, that is with two children.  In 2011 she finished 2nd in the Calgary 70.3 just 7 months after having a baby.  Oh, did I mention she also hold a PhD from the University of Edinburgh.

When I get home from training I quickly shift from athlete-mode to mom-mode  . . .

I think that all women should get in the habit of taking care of themselves for at least an hour or two a day.

Sara Gross

As for working out while pregnant, Sara says that she averaged 1-1.5 hours of exercise a day.  Running until week 32, biking until week 37, and swimming up until the day before her baby was born.

Sara confesses that her training has changed since having children.  She no longer is able to plan her training as much as before and must work around her babies schedules. To follow Sara online visit her website at www.saragross.ca.

Heather Gollnick

3 Children, 5X Ironman Champion

Heather is 44 years old a mother of three children and has over 100 podium finishes as a professional triathlete.  In fact if you check out her website at HeatherGollnick.com you will see that those top finishes just keep rolling in at nearly every race she enters.

We had a third child and ever since it has been complete madness with my husband and I being out numbered. Training is not the number one thing but I can still get out there and mix it up and love it!

Also remember training will always be there, your little ones get so big so fast.

Heather Gollnick

Heather states that she has no intention of slowing down any time soon and loves the thrill of racing and competing on a professional level.  She is the author of Triathlon EQ which states that endurance sports are as much a test of emotional endurance as physical stamina.

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To top it all off, Heather also provides triathlon coaching and is a public speaker.  Find out more about her coaching here.

Michelle Andres

5 children, full time teacher, 3rd Age Group Finisher Kona Ironman Championships

Michelle is an example of a “regular” mom who set her mind on a goal and made it happen.  She has a full time job as a teacher, she is the mother of 5 children, yet she still finds time to train and compete on a very high level.  She is 36 years old and holds the Minnesota state record for the Ironman Triathlon.  Her Ironman time at Kona was 9:50 which was good enough to earn her the #3 spot in her age group. She did all of this with no coach and most of her training was done in her basement on a stationary bike and treadmill.

If its important to you, you’ll find a way, if its not important, you’ll find an excuse. We all have more time in our day than what we think, we just waste a lot of time on things that are not important.

Michelle Andres

She now has her sites set on qualifying for the Olympic trials in the marathon.

Are You a Marathon Mom?

While all of these women have amazing stories to share and have all accomplished a lot professionally in terms of running, they all say the same thing: running after having a baby is not easy, but with planning and determination it is doable.

You may not be trying to win a triathlon or qualify for the Olympic trials, but you can reach your goals with running and weight loss.  You can accomplish what you set your mind to.

Are you a mom who continues to run?  Do you have tips for running with children?  Share your thoughts below in the comments.

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